A Review of "The Reason for God"

Many of you probably do not know this, but I have gone through many periods, especially during the fall of 2013, where I was absolutely fascinated with apologetics, or the reasoned defense of the Christian faith.  While I am no expert in this area, there are several books I would recommend to someone who is interested.  However, my first suggestion will be the one I most recently read, Tim Keller’s bestseller “The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism”.  

 

For anyone who has not read a Tim Keller book before, he is an excellent writer who does a nice job of not speaking down to or over his audience.  Keller speaks honestly but avoids being harsh or brash with his words or tone.  It can often be difficult in the field of apologetics to speak to the audience in a way that is honest yet non-condemning of others for their stance against Christianity, and this is part of what Keller does so well.  He speaks with the honesty of a pastor up at the pulpit but with the sensitivity of a counselor as well, seeking to understand the objections of his readers while simultaneously identifying with some of them as well.  However, he still presents the readers with what he believes to be true and why he believes it.

A faith without some doubts is like a human body without any antibodies in it. People who blithely go through life too busy or indifferent to ask hard questions about why they believe as they do will find themselves defenseless against either the experience of tragedy or the probing questions of a smart skeptic.
— Tim Keller

While this book is not an all-encompassing look at apologetics, I believe that Keller deals with the most important issues and uncovers the heart behind them.  He mainly focuses on seven of the most common objections to the Christian faith, scientific or otherwise, and then gives reasons for belief in the message that the Bible gives.  He is not seeking to get into a debate, though he does refute some of the more common arguments against the God of the Bible.  Instead, he wants people to see that a worldview that includes Jesus Christ being Lord and Savior is more compelling than any other.  


In the introduction, Keller encourages his readers to look at doubt in a radically new way.  For Christians, he encourages them to acknowledge and wrestle with them, as, “A faith without some doubts is like a human body without any antibodies in it.  People who blithely go through life too busy or indifferent to ask hard questions about why they believe as they do will find themselves defenseless against either the experience of tragedy or the probing questions of a smart skeptic.” (pg. xvii)  For non-Christian skeptics in particular, he wants them to see that their reasons for non-belief need to be recognized for what they are, a position of faith, which needs to be investigated like anything else.  I would encourage anyone in either position to do the same.  Take the time to investigate and determine what it is you believe about the world.  It is the most important decision you will ever make in your life.  This book, from a Christian perspective, is a good place to start searching.  

-Clay